Day 1 - Frame and Learn Activities

Day 1 Overview :

Day 1 is typically structured discussions to create a shared path for the sprint week. You can “start at the end” with a long-term goal, map the challenge to determine focus moments, and ask customers/experts about the challenge at hand. By the end of the day you’ll pick a target: an ambitious but manageable piece of the problem that you can solve in one week.

Day 1 Activities

  • Long-Term Goal – where the team wants to be year(s) into the future
    • Why do this? You’ll want to have shared direction with the team so that they’re moving towards the future state through the sprint (and beyond).
    • Advance Concepts® - Key tips/learnings:
      • Have a shared direction with the Decider PRIOR to starting the sprint, a “Challenge” to solve.
      • A strong long-term goal should be based from a key Business Problem AND a Customer Problem/Desire that relates.
      • It helps if the goal envisions an outcome and has some aspirational metric of success.
    • Sprint Book - pages 53-56
      • Key tips: Begin with the end in mind. If you did everything right in the Sprint, you should be well on the path to achieving your long-term goal. Ask your team, “Why are we doing this project? Where do we want to be in six months, a year, or even five years from now?” These questions are very important, so don’t expect them to be easy.
    • Goal & Sprint Questions (6:03) AJ&Smart
    • Long Term Goal (14:03) AJ&Smart
  • Sprint Questions (aka Killer Questions) – the most important questions you’ll need to answer, and focus on during the sprint
    • Why do this? Killer questions allow you to learn in the important areas that reduce the risk and uncertainty of these high-value initiatives.
    • Advance Concepts® - Key tips/learnings:
      • We like “killer” questions because it helps you think about what are the most important questions we need to answer, that could “kill” this effort
      • Guiding the team to focus on customer-related killers questions is best for sprint testing. This is human-centered design, and that should be a key problem to understand if you’re doing the sprint. Teams often get hung up on technology and business questions to answer. We think there is more agility to tackle those, but you won’t be able to change customers.
      • It helps to frame these as “Can We…. “ questions so that you can test and strive for clear Yes/No answers at the end.
    • Sprint Book – pages 57-58
      • Key tips:
    • See videos above (included in them)
  • Map – a simple diagram to show how customers move through your “solution” or experience
    • Why do it? It’s impossible to tackle complex problems all at once. Using a map helps the group identify key moments to focus in on first, because they are most important/risky.
    • Advance Concepts® - Key tips/learnings:
      • We spent many sprints going back and forth on whether the map was “Current State” (identifying problems and paint-points) and “Future State” (ideal state). IT DOESN”T HAVE TO BE EITHER. The map is simply a HIGH-LEVEL look at the experience as we roughly expect it.
      • It helps start with something. Often you can craft a starter map with the decider prior to the sprint. Then, simply confirm with the group that its “on the right track”. Limit revision and striving for perfection.
    • Sprint Book – pages 59-67
      • Key tips: Take a intricate and messy system and make it into a simple map. Start with key actors on the left and the outcome on the right. Keep it simple!
    • How to draw the map (13:24) AJ&Smart
    • The Map (14:54) AJ&Smart
  • Ask the Experts & How-Might-We Capturing (HMW) – nobody knows everything and talking to experts is fast
    • Why do it? Knowledge is often dispersed and learning together helps teams reach shared direction on what’s important.
    • Advance Concepts® - Key tips/learnings:
      • Having Customers involved is the most valuable “expert”. You don’t have to wait for a time-slot in the sprint. Consider pre-work, including them all week, or talking to them during this activity. Or all 3.
      • We’ve seen value when experts can share clear and concise reports. Those key-learnings are simply to translate into HMWs.
      • HMWs are best captured in a “goldi-locks” state. Not too ambiguous/broad, but also not too specific (limiting ideation). It’s important to show this clearly with the team.
    • Sprint Book – pages 68-78
      • Key tips (Expert Interview): Review the boards created in the sprint so far with the experts. Ask them to describe what they know in relation to what you’ve started. Leave room for questions and be ready to update your map, sprint questions, and long-term goal.
      • Key tips (HMW note taking): Prior to the interview describe HMWs. Show the team how to capture with HMW labeled stickies. As the team listens they can capture HMW notes, one per sticky. Save organizing for later – just compile for now.
    • How Might We (6:21) AJ&Smart
    • How Might We Notes Explained (2:51) Keller (this is agnostic of the Sprint, but fitting)
    • Expert Interviews (6:11) Relab
    • (This is focused on stakeholders, but we recommend a customer-focus as the priority)

    • Ask the Experts (16:48) AJ&Smart (Note that this is Sprint 2.0 focus-group style, but still good learnings)
  • HMW Organizing and Voting – quickly organize HMWs by themes to help the team to read and vote where opportunity lies
    • Why do it? HMW’s are areas of opportunity that can be solved for in many ways. After voting on important HMWs to the long-term goal, the team can see where the fall on the Map. This provides direction on where to focus for the duration of the sprint.
    • Advance Concepts® - Key tips/learnings:
      • We’ve found it to be helpful to give the team a few mins to individually organize and discard poor HMWs. Less is more.
      • Once ready, we’ve found it helpful for the team to read HMWs one-at-a-time. That way if there is a near exact duplicate from someone else, it can be discarded. Meanwhile the facilitators can begin bucketing similar HMWs into theme areas. These small clusters help visually show similar HMWs. (This is simplified version of a Design Thinking activity, “Affinity Clustering”) .
    • Sprint Book – pages 79-82
      • Key tips: The prioritization process does not need to be perfect! Ask the team to review HMWs first, before voting. Then once reviewed quickly place the vote on the pre-determined HMWs most important to the long-term goal and sprint questions. (2 dots per, 4 for the decider)
    • Organize HMW (1:27) Polluck
  • Target – with the days information available, pick a target (target customer , target map moment, and top sprint questions)
    • Why do it? It would take a long time to determine the exact right customer and problems to solve for. We utilize our best knowledge and judgement to act on a high-value aspect. And it’s determined with the teams input. That way everyone is moving in the same direction for the sprint (ideation, prototyping, and testing).
    • Advance Concepts® - Key tips/learnings:
      • This is a key moment for the Decider. Be sure to give them all the time/help they need to make a well-reasoned decision. This could mean calling a break or asking for a “pass-the-mic” vote explanation from the team.
      • This is a great place to end a day. The team diverged on data collection and then is converging on the target. This feeling of closure and direction is very important to the energy of the team
      • Sometimes we as facilitator/guides will prioritize the questions to be most impactful for a great sprint test.
    • Sprint Book – pages 83-94
      • Key tips: Sometimes its easy for the Decider, to simply decide. Typically, though Deciders want to engage the team and hear their input. When this is the case, use a simple straw-poll vote.
    • Straw Poll Voting (suggested here, but broadly applicable too)